Present Business Plan

A good business plan is always evolving, and every last detail is rarely ever set in stone.

This means that the first version of your plan probably won’t (and shouldn’t be) your last.

Limit your plan to two typefaces (one for headings and one for body copy and subheadings, for example) that you can find in a standard text editor like Microsoft Word or Google Docs.

Only pick fonts that are easy to read and contain both capital and lowercase letters.

Before you set fingers to the keyboard, we’re going to walk you through the most important things to keep in mind to help you tackle the writing process confidently — with plenty of real life business plan examples along the way! There’s no version of you presenting an 80-page business plan to an investor and they enthusiastically dive in and take hours out of their day to pore over the thing front to back.

There’s this oldschool idea that business plans need to be ultra-dense, complex documents the size of a doorstop because that’s how you convey how serious you are about your company. Complexity and length for complexity and length’s sake is almost never a good idea, especially when it comes to writing a business plan. If your chief goal is using your business plan to secure investment capital, then it means you intend on getting it in front of an investor. Instead, they’re looking for you to get your point across as quickly and clearly as possible so they can skim your plan and get to the most salient parts to determine whether or not they think your opportunity is worth pursuing (or at the very least initiating further discussions).

Bottom line: always be on the lookout for opportunities to “trim the fat.” If you fill your business plan with buzzwords, industry-specific jargon or acronyms, and long complicated sentences, it might make sense to a handful of people familiar with your niche and those with superhuman attention spans (not many), but it alienates the vast majority of readers who aren’t experts in your particular industry.

Your best bet here is to use simple, straightforward language that’s easily understood by anyone — from the most savvy of investor to your Great Aunt Bertha who still uses a landline.

Avoid script-style or jarring fonts that distract from the actual content.

Modern, sans-serif fonts like Helvetica, Arial, and Proxima Nova are a good way to go.

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