Nuclear Weapons Essay Paper

Nuclear Weapons Essay Paper-47
In 1980, the historic Brazilian-Argentine Agreement on the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy established "technical cooperation and coordination of civilian nuclear policy." A string of treaties followed, which emphasized the importance of mutual transparency between the two countries' nuclear programs and allowed the two countries to inspect each other's nuclear power plants—even those to which the International Atomic Energy Agency did not have access. By the end of the 1990s, both Brazil and Argentina had ratified the Treaty of Tlatelolco, which created the Latin American Nuclear Weapons Free Zone, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Jeff Blair Since the dawn of the nuclear age and the subsequent onset of the Cold War, tense arms races have swept the world, threatening global security.

In 1980, the historic Brazilian-Argentine Agreement on the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy established "technical cooperation and coordination of civilian nuclear policy." A string of treaties followed, which emphasized the importance of mutual transparency between the two countries' nuclear programs and allowed the two countries to inspect each other's nuclear power plants—even those to which the International Atomic Energy Agency did not have access. By the end of the 1990s, both Brazil and Argentina had ratified the Treaty of Tlatelolco, which created the Latin American Nuclear Weapons Free Zone, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Jeff Blair Since the dawn of the nuclear age and the subsequent onset of the Cold War, tense arms races have swept the world, threatening global security.

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By the mid-1950s the United States "retained ultimate control over the processes" of Brazil's "Atoms for Peace" program and oversaw its extraction of uranium.

It wasn't until 1975 that Brazil would boldly assert its autonomy by announcing it would henceforth receive its nuclear technology from West Germany, not the United States. In Argentina, President Raul Alfonsin handed over the country's nuclear program to civilian control and introduced legislation "to legally prohibit development of nuclear weapons." By choosing to disengage from the arms race in order to address internal problems—a choice supported by civilians in both countries—Brazil and Argentina were at last able to pursue disarmament. "Brazilian-Argentine Relations in the 1980s: From Wary Rivalry to Friendly Competition." .

Catastrophic effects of nuclear weapons → “Nuclear weapons are unique in their destructive power, in the unspeakable human suffering they cause, in the impossibility of controlling their effects in space and time, and in the threat they pose to the environment, to future generations, and indeed to the survival of humanity.” – International Committee of the Red Cross, 2010 Nuclear weapons pose a direct and constant threat to people everywhere.

Far from keeping the peace, they breed fear and mistrust among nations.

At last, they had concluded a "series of agreements that defused the nuclear rivalry between the two countries and committed both to exclusively peaceful use of nuclear technology." Across the world, in South Asia, India and Pakistan have been involved in a nuclear arms race that has outlasted the Cold War.

The rivalry between these two countries dates back to their partition in 1947, and their conflicts have been more volatile and their negotiations less flexible than those of Brazil and Argentina. Nuclear weapons are the only devices ever created that have the capacity to destroy all complex life forms on Earth.It would take less than 0.1% of the explosive yield of the current global nuclear arsenal to bring about devastating agricultural collapse and widespread famine.Pakistan began developing a nuclear bomb in 1972 in order to compete with and protect itself from India's military capabilities. In the years that followed, tensions escalated, and by the 1980s, the two countries were competing in an arms race that created widespread fear of nuclear Armageddon. Though the strained relations between Brazil and Argentina peaked in the late 1970s, the "rivalry and subtle tensions between the two countries can be traced back to colonial days." As Brazil gained international recognition in the 20th century, Argentina accelerated its nuclear program in an effort to check its rival's burgeoning power. Argentina's nuclear program advanced quickly and "by the early 1980s was thought to be about five years ahead of Brazil in having the capability to produce material suitable for a nuclear weapon." Recognizing Argentina as a viable threat, Brazil consequently increased its nuclear capabilities; the nationalism and rivalry between the two Latin nations had become an essential part of the countries' nuclear arsenals. The world supported the nuclear programs of Brazil and Argentina by providing supplies and assistance. In the 1940s, Brazil's nuclear program was advanced when the United States agreed to give Brazil technological information on nuclear arms in exchange for mining rights. Nations still cling to the misguided idea of “nuclear deterrence”, when it is clear that nuclear weapons only cause national and global insecurity.There have been many documented instances of the near-use of nuclear weapons as a result of miscalculation or accidents.

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